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Baggage

Now that I'm home, bathed, settled, and fed, All nicely tucked into my warm new bed. I would like to open my baggage Lest I forget, There is so much to carry - So much to regret.

Hmm... Yes there it is, right on the top - Let's unpack Loneliness, Heartache and Loss, And there by my leash hides Fear and Shame.

As I look on these things I tried so hard to leave - I still have to unpack my baggage called Pain. I loved them, the others, the ones who left me, But I wasn't good enough - for they didn't want me. Will you add to my baggage? Will you help me unpack? Or will you just look at my things and take me right back?

Do you have the time to help me unpack? To put away my baggage, To never re-pack? I pray that you do - I'm so tired you see, But I do come with baggage - Will you still want me?

By Evelyn Colbath

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Tea Cup Yorkies

This is a statement from the Yorkshire Terrier Club of America about Teacup Yorkies

"If you are interested in purchasing a tiny Yorkie, sometimes called a Teacup, Micro Mini, Teenie, or any other name that means "extra small", there are several things you should consider. The YTCA's Code of Ethics precludes the use of the words "teacup", "tiny specialists", doll faced, or similar terminology by its members, and for good reason.

All breeders may occasionally have an unusually small Yorkie (hopefully healthy), though no responsible breeder breeds for this trait. Many breeders prefer a general weight range of 4-7 four pounds believing that size retains desired Toy qualities while maintaining optimum health. The Yorkie Standard states weight "must not exceed seven pounds" and as a prospective pet owner you should realize that even at 7 pounds, the Yorkie is still a small dog. (Females weighing less than 5 pounds are considered by most breeders to be unsuitable for breeding.)

Special circumstances often come with extra tiny dogs. They are extremely susceptible to both hereditary and non-hereditary health problems, including birth defects that may go undetected for a long time. Other common problems may include, but are not limited to, diarrhea, vomiting, along with extra and expensive tests prior to routine teeth cleanings and surgeries. Small ones are more likely to have poor reactions to anesthesia and die from it. Tiny dogs are more easily injured by falls, being stepped on and being attacked by other dogs. These health problems nearly always result in large veterinary bills.

Please take this into consideration and make purchasing a healthy pet your top priority, not size. The "novelty" is certainly not worth the pain, heartbreak, or extra expense. Remember, all Yorkies are comparatively small. The most important thing is finding a healthy puppy that will grow into a healthy adult, especially since you looking at an 11 to 15 year commitment with your Yorkie."

              OK Yorkie Rescue Abby